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Brewers have largest attendance increase in National League from 2013 to 2014

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Though the team finished with one of the worst collapses in franchise history, fans should be commended for showing up in droves throughout the season.

Mike McGinnis

For most of the season, the Milwaukee Brewers seemed like a pretty good team. At this point, I think '150 days' is pretty well ingrained in all of our heads. That early success ended up helping ticket sales as the team had the largest increase in attendance from last year of any National League team.

According to the Milwaukee Business Journal, the Brewers drew 2,797,384 fans this season, a 10.52% increase from the 2,531,115 who came to Miller Park in 2013. Of course, 2014 isn't close to the highest mark the organization has seen in the 10 year since Mark Attanasio took over as owner.

Year Attendance
2014 2,797,384
2013 2,531,115
2012 2,831,385
2011 3,071,373
2010 2,776,531
2009 3,037,451
2008 3,068,458
2007 2,869,144
2006 2,335,643
2005 2,211,023

Still, the mark is impressive for Milwaukee, the smallest market in baseball. In fact, their 2.8 million fans coming to Miller Park was the eighth-largest attendance in the MLB and fourth-largest in the National League in 2014. The Brewers drew larger crowds than big markets like Chicago (both ballclubs), Texas, Philadelphia, New York (Mets), Houston and Miami. The Brewers also drew larger crowds than five of 10 playoff teams: The Nationals, Royals, Orioles, Pirates and Athletics.

A 21-10 start certainly helped with high attendance numbers, though it should be noted that the Brewers have had outstanding preseason sales numbers in recent years. The team reached 1,000,000 in ticket sales by mid-January for the 2013 season, and had a decrease of just 6% in preseason sales going into 2014 despite finishing 2013 with a 74-88 record, good for fourth in the NL Central.

Nice job in 2014, Brewers fans. I don't think there's any doubt that Milwaukee can well and truly be called a baseball town.